Onion Plants

zone chart

The secret to growing the largest, most flavorful onions is to start with onion plants, rather than sets or seeds. Putting established plants in the ground gives you the tremendous advantage of a head start on the growing season with earlier onions.


Our onion plants are field-grown in Texas and shipped directly to you from the fields, ready for planting. Unless otherwise noted, we will ship your order according to your Hardiness Zone:

  • Zones 8, 9, 10 in January–Early February
  • Zone 7 in Late January–Mid-February
  • Zone 6 in Mid-February–Early March
  • Zone 5 in Mid-March–Mid-April
  • Zone 4 in Mid/Late April–Mid-May
  • Zones 2–3 in Mid–Late May

Onions are categorized into three growing types: Short-day, Intermediate-day, and Long-day.

  • Short-day Onions produce bulbs where the total amount of daylight received is about 10-12 hours—which is the amount that the southern states receive in the summer.
  • Intermediate-day Onions produce bulbs where the total amount of daylight is approximately 12-14 hours—which is the amount that the mid-section states receive in the summer. Intermediates are also known as day-neutral onions.
  • Long-day Onions produce bulbs where the total amount of daylight is 14-16 hours. That is what the northern states receive in the summer.

In order to grow the healthiest, best-tasting onions, the pH level of your garden soil should be 6.0-7.0. Using a soil tester will take the guesswork out of determining pH levels.

Browse these categories under "Onion Plants"

Short-day Onions

Short-day Onions

Intermediate-day Onions

Intermediate-day Onions

Long-day Onions

Long-day Onions